FAQs

FAQs

For your convenience your most Frequently Asked Questions about therapy are answered.

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Q?

How confidentiality handled?

A.

Understandably, most parents want to know exactly what goes on in therapy sessions.  It’s important to allow your teen to have some confidentiality. Your teen will probably reveal information to their therapist they won't disclose to you because they don’t have to worry about disappointing the therapist.  That is why therapy works.  I try to work on communication with the teen so that they can tell their parent what is going on and how you can help.  Allowing this process to be confidential is essential to the therapist/teen relationship.

Q?

As a Teen, what can I expect from therapy?

A.

When you see a therapist, they will talk with you about your feelings, thoughts, relationships, and important values. At the beginning, therapy sessions are focused on discussing what you'd like to work on and setting goals. Some of the goals people in therapy may set include things like improving self-esteem and confidence, figuring out how to make more friends, feeling less depressed or less anxious, improving grades at school, learning to manage anger and frustration, making healthier choices (for example, about relationships or eating) and ending self-defeating or self-harming behaviors.

It might take a few sessions with a therapist before you will feel like you can share personal stuff. It is natural to feel that way. Trust is a very important part of therapy as it involves being open and honest about sensitive topics like feelings, ideas, relationships, problems, disappointments and hopes. It’s understandable that teens sometimes take a while to feel comfortable sharing personal details like this.

Q?

Does going to therapy mean I am crazy or what if my friends find out?

A.

No, going to therapy doesn't mean you're crazy! You'd probably be surprised to find that many people in your class have probably seen a therapist at some point. Getting help in dealing with emotions and stressful situations is as important to your overall health as getting help with a medical problem like asthma or diabetes. Some people find that discussing their progress in therapy with friends is helpful while others prefer not to tell anyone. Either way, it is a personal decision and you don't have to tell anyone if you don't want to.

There's nothing wrong with getting help with problems that are hard to solve alone. In fact, it's just the opposite. It takes a lot of courage and maturity to look for solutions to problems instead of ignoring or hiding them and allowing them to become worse. If you think that therapy could help you with a problem, ask an adult you trust — like a parent, teacher, school counselor, or doctor — to help you find a therapist.

Therapy is helpful to people of all ages and with problems that range from mild to much more serious. Some people still hold on to old beliefs about therapy, such as thinking that teens "will grow out of" their problems. If the adults in your family don't seem open to talking about therapy, mention your concerns to a school counselor, coach, or doctor.